Field day to focus on rice and soybean issues

Aug. 11, 2011
Contact Information:

Roger Eason, Director, Pine Tree Research Station, Colt, 870-633-5767, reason@uark.edu.

Howell Medders, Communications, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture, Fayetteville. 479-575-5647, hmedders@uark.edu

Download story

COLT, Ark. -- Visitors to a field day Thursday, Aug. 18, at the Pine Tree Research Station will see University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture research on rice and soybean issues concerning farmers in eastern Arkansas, said Roger Eason, station director.

Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. Field tours from 8:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. will be followed by an indoor presentation on managing herbicide-resistant pigweed by Bob Scott, a weed scientist based at the Lonoke Extension and Research Center. The event will conclude with a complementary lunch.

The Pine Tree Research Station is on Hwy 306 eight miles west of Colt. For detailed directions, visit http://aaes.uark.edu/pinetree.html.

Field tour topics and presenters will include:

-- Rice false smut disease, David TeBeest, professor of plant pathology, Fayetteville;

-- Rice variety test performance report including possible future varieties, Karen Moldenhauer, professor of rice breeding and genetics, Rice Research and Extension Center, Stuttgart;

-- Rice insecticide seed treatments and soybean insect pests, Gus Lorenz, extension entomologist, Lonoke;

-- Soybean production issues, including fertility, varieties and seeding rate, Jeremy Ross, extension agronomist, Little Rock;

-- Soybean yield challenge, Lanny Ashlock, research coordinator for the Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board, Little Rock;

-- Rice and soybean fertilization, Trenton Roberts, research associate professor of crop, soil and environmental sciences, Fayetteville;

-- Soybean breeding program, variety test report and possible future varieties, Pengyin Chen, professor of soybean breeding and genetics, Fayetteville; and

-- Rice fertilization and research on phosphorus and potassium fertility, Nathan Slaton, professor of crop, soil and environmental sciences, Fayetteville.